IP Address Doesn’t Prove Anything in piracy

The US Judicial Courts were busy from half a decade with piracy cases. Judges are now tired of such cases and are very certain about the claims from the copy right holders. Recently a man was accused of unlawful downloading the Adam Sandler movie, “The Cobbler.”

Copyright Holders of the movie in this case evidenced IP address of accused person, Thomas Gonzalez that was used in pirating the film. In the month of March, Magistrate Judge, Stacie Beckerman of the Oregon District court has dismissed this case filed by the creators of the movie.

Gonzales runs an adult foster care home which is notable and he is not the only one who access the internet or download the movies through it. Anyways, the judge argues that one cannot accuse someone for a copyright infringement just with the IP address used to download the movie. According to the Torrentfreak, Berckerman stated that Gonzalez’s unique internet protocol assignment was “not enough” to prove he was guilty.

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“The only facts Plaintiff pleads in support of its allegation that Gonzales is the infringer, is that he is the subscriber of the IP address used to download or distribute the movie, and that he was sent notices of infringing activity to which he did not respond. That is not enough.”

“Plaintiff has not alleged any specific facts tying Gonzales to the infringing conduct. While it is possible that the subscriber is also the person who downloaded the movie, it is also possible that a family member, a resident of the household, or an unknown person engaged in the infringing conduct.”

After the dismissal of the claims for both direct and indirect copyright infringement by the Judge Beckerman, a conclusion District Court Judge, Anna Brown adopted it earlier this month, according to the TorrentFreak.

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Now the question is whether judges across the country stick to the same judgement in such cases. We agree that the copy right holders have all rights to project their films from pirates. But they can’t accuse anyone with just IP address as a proof. So, Hollywood creators have to find valid additional proofs of accessing illegal content beyond the IP-addresses.