Louisville National Championship

Louisville became the first program in NCAA’s history to vacate a national championship. The men’s basketball program will vacate its 2013 national championship due to involvement in a sex scandal, as reported by NCAA.

The program also had to let go of its winning titles in the basketball games played by players during the period 2012 – 2015 where they celebrated 123 wins against their opponents.

The investigation by NCAA Infractions Appeals Committee led to the discovery of certain malpractices practiced by the affected team, which paved the way to causing violations of the existing rules that they were supposed to abide by. As per the report, it was found that the staff of the Gaming Committee was illegally supplying escorts and strippers to the players of the institute. The university president Greg Postel was quoted as saying that due to the allegations faced by the university, they are liable to pay a fine of around $600,000 to the NCAA Authorities.

Postel strongly disapproved of the charges and punishment faced by the basketball program, which was previously holding a reputable position since past three years. “I cannot say this strongly enough: We believe the NCAA is simply wrong,” Postel said.

As per trusted sources, the scandal came to light when former escort Katrina Powell published a book titled “Breaking Cardinal Rules: Basketball and the Escort Queen”. Through this book, she claimed to have maintained close relations with Mr. Andre McGee, who was an assistant coach at that time. Through this association, she is said to have provided strippers to the parties hosted in the hostel and earned around $10,000 during that time.

On Tuesday, the NCAA Authorities forced Louisville to vacate its records and pay a penalty due to the direct association of staff members in encouraging illicit activities in their presence.

The appeal made by college authorities to decrease the level of punishment went unheard. The authorities realised that it is difficult to overrule the penalties awarded by the NCAA at this point.